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News

Mid April Newsletter: Butterfly Man vs Banksy, Vector Meldrew AR, Voucher update

About Banksy…..

It has been an exciting couple of weeks since the last newsletter.  Huge amounts of great new art have been created; artists have led the political agenda; Banksy influenced art is popular as always and street art tours are up and running!


Butterfly Man homage to Banksy

Expressionist street art drawing of Banksy maid with white paper butterflies in Shoreditch by Butterfly Man aka Sell Out

Sweep It Under The Carpet homage to Banksy by Butterfly Man

Among many of Banksy’s witty and widely appreciated street art works was the long since disappeared “Sweep It Under The Carpet Maid, originally seen on the streets of LA in 2006 then subsequently in Hoxton Square and Chalk Farm London.

Banksy street art in London showing maid sweeping dirt under the carpet

Banksy, “Sweep It Under The Carpet” (with repairs),

The local artist Butterfly Man, formerly known as Sell Out, created a wonder expressionist tribute just off Brick Lane today to Banksy’s maid.  The maid was about to sweep something under a carpet but a kaleidoscope of brilliant white butterflies has burst out and fluttered across Dan Kitchener’s brilliant mural.

comparison of Banksy and Butterfly Man street art images of maids sweeping dirt under the carpet

Banksy vs Butterfly Man – “Sweeping It Under The Carpet”


The Ultimate Banksy History

On the subject of Banksy, our current season of virtual street art tours draws to a close with  perennial favourite “Banksy – The London Chronicle” looking at a myriad of examples of Banksy’s brilliant street art in London.  Banksy emerged in Bristol but in terms of artistic development and heightened prominence it was his move to London in 2001 that really got the Banksy juggernaut rolling.

Banksy Stencil in East London of PLacard Rat with message Go to bed

Banksy Go Back To Bed placard rat

Join me in a live presentation highlighting the major milestones and the various threads that run through Banksy’s career, drawing on my huge personal library of photographs of Banksy street art.

Wednesday 14th April 1900 BST tickets

Sunday 18th 2200 BST 1700 NYC tickets

Banksy Stencil in London of old people called Thugs For Life called

Banksy Thugs For Life, London

Guess what, the London Rail map goes as far as Reading…. just saying.


Win a Banksy Virtual Tour ticket

Simply guess the date the photo above of the Camden “Sweep It Under The Carpet” (with repairs) maid was taken.

Just sign up to receive the Shoreditch Street Art newsletter HERE

AND enter your guess via Instagram, facebook or twitter

Competition closes Wednesday 14th April at 11am

Three closest guesses will be announced straight after the closing time and will be registered for the 7pm Wednesday 14th April presentation of “Banksy – The London Chronicle”


Amazing Augmented Reality Street Art

We love novel applications of technology and inventive concepts being brought to the world of street art, it doesn’t have to be just spraypaint, stencils and paste ups.  Vector Meldrew, the name is a play on Victor Meldrew the name of a well known character in a British sitcom many years ago and Vector being part of a form of digital illustration technology, has put up paste ups and stickers of a squat figure in sports shorts wearing a Star Wars clone trooper helmet. The the paste ups feature a QR code.

Vector Meldrew Paste up of man wearing clone trooper helmet

Pole dancing clone trooper – Vector Meldrew

Thankfully instead of taking you to the artist’s online shop the code initiates your camera in the Instagram app and superimposes an amazing dancing figure on the real life wall.  This next link shows the amazing effect captured on my iphone

Vector Meldrew is a keen advocate of technology and has created a real world treasure hunt giving people the chance to win a Vector Meldrew NFT (Non Fungible Token) art.   Check Vector Meldrew’s instagram or twitter feed for further details.


Vouchers validity extended

Just to let those of you who were bought vouchers as gifts, all vouchers which were valid and unused at 31 January 2020 have had their validity extended to 31December 2021, we look forward to seeing you on the tour with your voucher over the next few months.

For those of you wanting to purchase vouchers, it is very easy, click HERE


Street Art Tours Up and Running

Guess what, small but perfectly formed street art tours are back on!  Come and explore the constantly changing brilliantly exciting Shoreditch Street Art with Dave

Until further notice we are following these covid precautions:

Groups no more than 6 people (children are people too!) or two households (whichever is larger)

Minimum 2m social distancing gap between guests and guide at all times,

No special requirements apply between guests who come as “single household plus support bubble” i.e. a single booking.

Guest groups from different households/bookings will be responsible for maintaining social distancing between themselves.

The guide will wear a face covering, wearing a face covering is optional for guests

No cash – payment to be in advance by paypal or bank transfer, payments protected by a refund policy

Stay local, do something exciting, street art tour with Dave!


Kill THe Bill political stencil mural by Subdude in Shoreditch

Stencil mural by Subdude last weekend

FInally, sign up for automatic notifications of the newsletter HERE


Logo of street art zine Very Nearly Almost

Remembering Street Art Zine Very Nearly Almost

Lockdown has given the opportunity to spring clean the digital street art photograph archives.  Exploring defunct folders served as a reminder of the pleasure that came from nearly a decade of making a small photographic contribution to a street art zine.  Here is a little look back at the days of street art zine Very Nearly Almost including some precious memories that editor and founder George MacDonald kindly took the trouble to share.

Collection of Very Nearly Almost zine covers photo George MacDonald

Very Nearly Almost – photo courtesy George MacDonald

In 2006, a limited edition print release on the opening night of an art show by a street artist in Shoreditch would for sure result in a queue going down the street.  One Thursday it was opening night at Leonard St Gallery, I don’t recall which artists, someone walked up and down the queue giving away a photocopied street art zine.  It was a time the way art was shared and enjoyed was changing radically, street art fans and artists uploading photos to the internet, particularly street art forums and Flickr was fostering a very versatile, growing fan base.  Publishing that zine, Very Nearly Almost, on paper was definitely going against the digital tide.

Editions 1 and 2 Very Nearly Almost zine for street art

Very Nearly Almost Editions 1 and 2 – photo courtesy George MacDonald

Some months later the VNA editor George MacDonald got in touch asking if he could use a photo of some ephemeral street art piece or other from my Flickr collection, he’d give me a free copy (price had gone up to £3) so I said “sure”.  From that small interaction I became part of a small select group of London street art photographers who contributed photos to the zine.

“Those early days of VNA were all about the purity of documenting the scene. I felt passionate about capturing the hard work of street artists and so badly wanted to share them with everyone.”  George Macdonald, Editor VNA

Street Art Zine VNA DFace edition

Issue 10 D*Face regular and Limited edition screen print covers

The magazine’s print standards rose quickly, the quality of the writing improved significantly.

Very Nearly Almost Street Art Zine various editions

Very Nearly Big, Bigger and Biggest – Editions 3, 7 (C215) and 12 (Roa)

Each edition had a featured artist with a large interview and a special limited edition screen printed cover collector’s edition would come out.

Shepard Fairey Limited Edition covers for Street Art Zine VNA

Issue 15 Shepard Fairey regular and Limited edition screen print covers

Launch nights were held in galleries, pubs and boutiques and they became as rammed as any artist’s opening night.

VNA Very Nearly Almost zine launch party at Pictures On Walls Sep 2011

Edition 16 Space Invader Launch Event at Pictures On Walls September 2011

The magazine even won awards and got international distribution.

Very Nearly Almost street art zine edition 21 launch at old StolenSpace

Launch gathering, Old Stolen Space, Jan 2013

 “I look back on the VNA days fondly. We constantly tried to make the magazine better and better and the party’s bigger and bigger.” GM

Each edition of the magazine featured photos of the latest London street art and often featured the best from one or two “guest cities” around the World.  A very impressive collection of street art photographers from London chipped in flicks on a regular basis including Cheffo, Claude Crommelin, Delete, Howaboutno, Mark Rigney, Paul Gray, Romanywg and myself.  It was an honour to be among such a select group, having a photograph published in VNA was be regarded as prestigious.  It reached the stage where I’d take a street art photo, look at it and think “yep, going to hold that back, it might be good enough for VNA”.

“Flickr was the perfect place at that time for street art photographers. There was some serious competitive documentary photography going on.” GM

Very Nearly Almost VNA street art zine edition 23 Faile covers

VNA Edition 23 Faile covers

It was a thrill to get your hands on a new copy on launch night, weeks or months after you sent in your latest photos and see which if any of your photos made the edition.


April 2021: Check out the Easter series of Virtual Street Art Tours


Nelly Duff Gallery hosted Launch of Street Art Zine VNA Very Nearly Almost Edition 28 Mike Giant

Edition 28 launch at Nelly Duff Gallery 2014

Sadly VNA became rather a victim of its own success.  The publishing volumes, the commercial arrangements, the organisation of special artist contributions and the development of something called a life became too much for what was for almost everyone involved essentially a hobby.    George and his team called a dignified end to VNA in 2016, going out with a bang with a huge DFace edition.

VNA street art Zine Edition 35 D*Face cover

VNA Edition 35 D*Face cover

Staff at Very Nearly Almost zine

VNA editorial, production and sales team, StolenSpace 2017

“In the end, we needed to fully commit and keep pushing but we were all running out of time between family commitments and jobs. I felt it was slipping away from us so we pulled the plug. It’s a shame as I wanted to keep going until we got that Banksy cover but it never happened“ GM

Very Nearly Almost sticker by Mysterious Al for street art zine Very Nearly Almost VNA

Mysterious Al/VNA sticker 2013

So, where is this heading?   The archive of photos offered to VNA which never quite saw the light of day in print contains some beauties.  In almost every case the art no longer exists so it’s time to occasionally dig out those ex street art pieces.  Check out and follow the Instagram hashtag #VNAOneThatGotAway, who knows what nuggets might surface!

street art photo by NoLionsInEngland Dave Stuart not featured in Very Nearly Almost zine

#VNAOneThatGotAway – Fanakapan and Envol aka Horror Crew 2014

DFace stickers street art photo by NoLionsInEngland Dave Stuart not featured in Very Nearly Almost zine

#VNAOneThatGotAway DFace Stickers 2010

Ella et Pitr street art photo by NoLionsInEngland Dave Stuart not featured in Very Nearly Almost zine

#VNAOneThatGotAway Ella et Pitr 2010


Street Art Of Banksy at Reading Prison landscape shot

Art Of Banksy Appears at Reading Prison

A street art stencil has appeared on the wall of the former Reading nick and after making us wait a little while, it has just this afternoon been confirmed this is art of Banksy, the tease.

Street Art Of Banksy at Reading Prison wide context shot

Create Escape by Banksy, Reading Prison

 

As usual the confirmation comes simultaneously via his website and his Instagram and for the second time in less than a year it is in the form of a video showing in gripping detail an unidentified person spraying a stencil on a wall.  A well sorted stencilling strategy is so important to a successful outcome and the video contains many hints about the order of operations for this particular artwork.

Street Art Of Banksy at Reading Prison unnamed person stencilling

screengrab from “The Joy Of Painting With Bob Ross…and Banksy”, Copyright Banksy

The artwork depicts old fashioned “over the wall” flit by a prisoner and the presence of the typewriter suggests the escapee is a writer.  All the coverage has inferred the art is related to Oscar Wilde’s incarceration in Reading and that seems reasonable.  Lots of references to Oscar Wilde’s last published work “The Ballad of Reading Gaol” abound though many contend that the piece was written while Wilde was in Reading while literary historians say it was written post release.

Street Art Of Banksy at Reading Prison full shot

Create Escape by Banksy, Reading Prison

Plenty of local coverage draws attention to a campaign to turn the now closed prison into an arts centre so there could be a political aspect with Banksy possibly offering support, though this would be the exact opposite of his intervention in 2010 which condemned the use of his street art as the centrepiece of a new “art-hotel”.


Banksy’s London street art career is the subject of “Banksy – The London Chronicle” – the virtual presentation by Banksy expert Dave Stuart coming up over the Easter period, more details HERE 

composite image of Banksy street art with stencil rat and stencil Westway Highwayman

Banksy Virtual Tour – If Graffiti Changed Anything and Westway Highway Man


Three elements really raise this seemingly modest artwork in the Banksy cannon.  Its placement is stunning, it is by the give way lines on a major roundabout in inner Reading so the chances of the artist being spotted were very high and indeed there are reports and photographs of work in progress last Sunday.

Street Art Of Banksy at Reading Prison "Simple Intelligence Test In Dumb Animals", reproduced from Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall, copyright Banksy 2001

Work In Progress by anonymous photographer, Reading and Berkshire News

Secondly, it has context.  There is the physical context which is why you need to see the prison in the backdrop, not for nothing does Banksy’s video includes a rising birdseye view over the wall.  If you don’t see the prison buildings well, it’s just a high wall isn’t it.  The historical context too is important, this being where Oscar Wilde did time and so the prisoner has the old school (non graff) writer’s tools of the trade, the typewriter.  The weirdly downward pointing CCTV almost directly over the spot supplements the giggles nicely.

Street Art Of Banksy at Reading Prison closer shot

Create Escape by Banksy, Reading Prison

Most importantly, while politically it is relatively mute although some are contorting themselves to see it as Banksy support for a Reading art centre, it is a brilliant cartoon.  It ranks alongside the Simple Intelligence Test In Dumb Animals cartoon from Banksy’s 2001 book “Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall”.

"Simple Intelligence Test In Dumb Animals", reproduced from Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall, copyright Banksy 2001

“Simple Intelligence Test In Dumb Animals”, reproduced from Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall, copyright Banksy 2001

"Simple Intelligence Test In Dumb Animals", reproduced from Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall, copyright Banksy 2001

“Simple Intelligence Test In Dumb Animals”, reproduced from Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall, copyright Banksy 2001

"Simple Intelligence Test In Dumb Animals", reproduced from Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall, copyright Banksy 2001

“Simple Intelligence Test In Dumb Animals”, reproduced from Banging Your Head Against A Brick Wall, copyright Banksy 2001

There is a key aspect which the media hive seems to have collectively missed.  The prisoner has been almost universally described as escaping from the prison using knotted blankets, even this afternoon in its umpteenth repost on the piece the BBC is STILL adhering to the idea they are bedsheets yet that is clearly not the case.

Street Art Of Banksy at Reading Prison typewriter detail shot

Create Escape by Banksy, Reading Prison

Someone has given the wily prisoner a typewriter and under the guise of a major lengthy literary masterpiece, the prisoner has surreptitiously typed an escape rope on continuous paper.  This is about outsmarting your captors, just like the monkey in the intelligence test.  Or, as Banksy himself put it in his punchline to that cartoon “A lot of people never use their initiative, because no-one told them to”.

Street Art Of Banksy at Reading Prison typewriter detail shot

Create Escape by Banksy, Reading Prison

Awesome.

Photos: Dave Stuart except as stated

 


Graffiti Photos hanging at the ICA, London

London Walls ICA Exhibition 10 Years Ago

10 years ago the Institute Of Contemporary Arts was besieged by connoisseurs of graffiti photography when a small group of dedicated amateur graffiti photographers (there was no other type) curated by Delete and comprising himself, Buddz, Lee 102, Howaboutno, Joeppo and myself (under the pseudonym Nolionsinengland) created an exhibition of graffiti photography.  It wasn’t really credible to review the exhibition at the time but 10 years on, possibly less encumbered by modesty, it is nice to look back on fond memories and to reminisce with the London Walls photo gang.

Flyer promoting the London Walls graffiti photography exhibition held at the ICA London in 2011

London Walls Flyer, 2011

“Credibility thieves, vicarious thrill seekers, they [6 photographers] follow the graffiti into grime darkened urban corners and locations of un-certain legality; aged limbs but ready cameras scratch deep below the surface of a culture created by a disparate community of egotistical but talented dare-devils, London’s graffiti writers.” (London Walls Zine, 2011)

The first photo cull session was held in the Masque on Old Street, each of us had turned up bearing incredible photos of graffiti by TYPE (Rest In Paint) and after a shitload of horsetrading, the trio that appeared in the gallery are fitting reminders of TYPE’s powerful lettering.

“London walls was an amazing opportunity to exhibit some work, and put faces to many names” – Lee 102

5 graffiti photos by different graffiti photographers at the Institute Of Contemporary Arts London

London Walls photo collection

Exhibitions of graff photography just about never happened so the opening night was rammed, the queue went around the block, thanks perhaps to the uncompromising venue security for whom this lairy crowd wasn’t the usual ICA opening night set.  At one point Robbo yelled through the door “FAAACKIN sort it out Dave”, I pointed out to him that my wife was in the queue a way behind him and I couldn’t get her in either, “You’re in the shit mate” he astutely observed.

“The security wouldn’t let #TeamRobbo in as it was a full-house at the
ICA, I had to go around asking a few people to leave politely… Haha,
not sure that type of exhibition has been bettered since.” – Joeppo

People discussing graffiti photography at the London Walls Show, ICA 2011

London Walls photo collection

With the space heaving, a wonderful mingling of cultures took place.  Graff writers from all over town and from all crews mingled, bragged and applauded eachother. Robbo met Stik and this seemingly unlikely of pairings hit it off immensely.

“It felt like everyone in the London graff scene was there. A real pleasure to chat with Fenza and Shye, two of my favourite London writers. And Robbo, of course! – Delete

photos from the ICA London Walls show, 2011

London Walls photo collection

The positive reception show received from the graff community came as a surprise.  Graffiti writers take wonderful photographs which are now widely seen thanks to Instagram but in those days it was more limited to an audience of fans on Flickr or the few websites such as Hurt You Bad that followed the scene.  Their photos tend to convey the mastery of the can and the energy of the moment whereas the collection in this show took a broader, artier and more contextual view of the culture.

“This was the first graffiti related “thing” to happen at the ICA, which is an amazing location.  It felt like actually being an artist for the night.” – HowAboutNo

When you combine a large graff audience with free beer tagging of surfaces is inevitable, management were loudly un-impressed with the post party state of the premises.

Zine issued at the London Walls graffiti photography exhibition held at the ICA London in 2011

London Walls Zine, 2011

The opening of the show was accompanied by the launch of a zine “London Walls”, a compendium of more of the group’s photography which for those who were there is now probably the only tangible relic of that event.

“the ICA said it was the busiest opening night that anyone could ever remember, after about 8pm they had to do a one-in-one-out and the queue stretched right up The Mall.” – Delete

photos hanging at London Walls show at the ICA in 2011

London Walls photo collection

Here is a slideshow of all 30 photos displayed at London Walls, this is possibly the first time a comprehensive viewing has been made available online.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 “All the writers were chuffed about it and thanked us for doing it, which was a relief because there was a bit of a worry that they would think we were using their work for our own glorification” – Delete

Thanks to the London Walls team for their cooperation then and now and many many moments before and since.  Particularly for their consent to display their photos.

Thanks to all the writers who allowed us to incorporate their art in our photos

Links:

Delete Flickr

Joeppo LDNGraffiti

Lee 102 Instagram

HowAboutNo instagram

Buddz instagram

Dave Stuart instagram


Banksy artwork on a street showing a workman painting yellow no parking lines has painted no parking lines in shape of a yellow flower on the side of a building

Banksy Virtual Tour 10th Feb

Here is a Banksy reminder and a plea!

Banksy – The London Chronicle is scheduled for Wednesday 10th February at 1900GMT.

This is an online virtual Banksy Tour hosted by Dave Stuart from Shoreditch Street Art Tours on Zoom.  Book here

Photo montage, larger image is a stencilled rat with a paw dripping red paint and graffiti which says “If Graffiti changed anything it would be illegal”, second image is a Banksy stencil of a horse riding highwayman rearing back on its hind legs

Banksy – The London Chronicle 10th Feb 2021

Guests cams will be disabled – no need to dress up!


Now here is the plea:  Please share this information with any frontline NHS staff you know who might like a free ticket to join this virtual presentation.  If they email Shoreditch Street Art Tours free tickets are available

“Game Changer” – Banksy, Photo: Banksy website


Coming next week is the first public broadcast of our Political Street Art webinar.  Book here

Photo montage, larger image is a two painted portraits of children with very colourful clothing, the faces were sprayed by street artist Zabou, the colourful striped clothing was made from fabric and wool by Mexican street artist Victoria Villasanna. The smaller image is a stencil by the street artist Bambi which has the image of Emma Stone joyfully dancing with Ryan Gosling in the film La La Land but their heads have been replaced by Theresa May and Donald Trump and the caption changed to Lie Lie Land

Child Free Labour by Zabou and Victoria Villasanna, 2016; Lie Lie Land by Bambi, 2017

“Bulk buy” two virtual street art tours, the Banksy one and the political street art one, for a 10% discount.  Email for info (tickets not available by Eventbrite)


“ An amazing insight into Street Art, Graffiti Culture and the works of Banksy. ” (Thanks to Leiola via Tripadvisor reviews)

From the archives – this is what  a Banksy Tour looked like in 2006!

Shoreditch Street Art Tours, 10 years, Graffoto, Cancer Sell, HowAboutNo, Stef, Hoodacious, Shellshock, Bravo99, London

Banksy Tour 2006 feat Banksy, future Shoreditch Street Art Tours Dave and future Graffoto team Shellshock, NoLionsInEngland & HowAboutNo. Photo from HowAboutNo

All photos (except where stated) Dave Stuart

 


Photo of back of the old Seven Stars pub showing huge white flowers painted by ThisOne on back of pub, along with wall panels painted by Get Busy, Agony, Attai and Tizer

Virtual Tour Triple Truffle

Approaching half term we are bringing a trio of street art nuggets to the world of Virtual street art pleasure.

“Just enjoyed a fantastic virtual street art tour with Dave. …. He did a wonderful job, and though we physically did not see the works in place, we were able to see many more, because of the format. …. Dave was extremely knowledgeable and had an engaging format. Highly recommend. “ Tripadvisor, Jan 2021

Shoreditch Street Art Virtual Tour

First up, Wednesday 3rd February we debut a new presentation highlighting current street art in Shoreditch, most of it created within the past month.  Think of it as something like the closest to what we’d look at if we did a real street art right now (hold that thought – ahhhhhhhh).  There has been some amazing art created in Shoreditch since we had to suspend real world tours at the beginning of December but Shoreditch Street Art Tours has been using its daily exercise period to record the latest art updates

Photo montage of street art created in Shoreditch in past 3 months featuring David Speed, Daeh, Pablo Fiasco, Get Busy, Tom Blackford and Attai

Shoreditch Street Art featuring David Speed, Daeh, Pablo Fiasco, Get Busy, Tom Blackford and Attai

Book the “Shoreditch Street Art Today (Feb 2021)” here


Banksy – The London Chronicle

Next up on Wednesday 10th February the ever popular Banksy – The London Chronicle is back again.  Looking at Banksy’s rise to fame through the prism of his London street art career, featuring nearly 100 Banksy artworks and 150 photos.

Book “Banksy – The London Chronicle” here

Photo montage, larger image is a stencilled rat with a paw dripping red paint and graffiti which says “If Graffiti changed anything it would be illegal”, second image is a Banksy stencil of a horse riding highwayman rearing back on its hind legs

Banksy – The London Chronicle


Political Street Art

Finally, yet another new presentation makes its debut, “Political Street Art”, a photographic review of political street art in London over the past 15 years.   I say “new” but the nucleus of “Political Street Art” has its origins as a segment included in some private virtual tours for schools and higher academic institutions.

Photo montage, larger image is a two painted portraits of children with very colourful clothing, the faces were sprayed by  street artist Zabou, the colourful striped clothing was made from fabric and wool by Mexican street artist Victoria Villasanna.  The smaller image is a stencil by the street artist Bambi which has the image of Emma Stone joyfully dancing with Ryan Gosling in the film La La Land but their heads have been replaced by Theresa May and Donald Trump and the caption changed to Lie Lie Land

Child Free Labour by Zabou and Victoria Villasanna, 2016; Lie Lie Land by Bambi, 2017

Book “Political Street Art” here


Go LARGE!

Discounted “combination” tickets for more than one presentation can be acquired by email info@shoreditchstreetarttours.co.uk direct.  Each individual “tour” costs £10; any 2 tours £18, all three tours £24.  Combination tickets will be issued manually, just tell us in an email which combination you would like and you will be sent a paypal invoice to pay by paypal or credit/debit card.


SUPPORT THE NHS – THANKS TO NHS HEROES

In gratitude for the huge effort our NHS heroes are putting in for our welfare and safety, a limited number of free tickets for each presentation are available to NHS staff on request by email.

Image by Banksy done in either charcoal or pencil of a boy in dungarees playing with a small doll which is a nurse in uniform rather than a caped superhero

Banksy Supports the NHS (canvas donated to Southampton General Hospital, June 2020), image courtesy Banksy.co.uk


Please remember the email address you signed up to this virtual tour with, use that to sign into Zoom. If you or anyone else using your device has previously signed into zoom and the “Remember User” box was checked it might be a good idea to sign out of Zoom first before clicking the Eventbrite “Join Now” button.

all photos: Dave Stuart


RIP tribute to MF DOOM graffiti in Shoreditch by Esau-Teric

MF Doom Tributes in Shoreditch

News of the sad passing of MF Doom emerged on New Years Eve inspiring many graffiti and street art tributes to the MC and rapper.

The featured image above is a characteristically complex piece by Esau-teric.

MF DOOM character in Shoreditch by Tizer

MF Doom Character by Trafik

 

MF DOOM character in Shoreditch by Tizer and 2Rise

MF DOOM RIP by Trafik feat Tizer and 2Rise

RIP tribute to MF DOOM graffiti in Shoreditch by Doomega

MF Doom RIP by Doomega

A collection of MF Tribute graffiti from around the world can be found on COMPLEX.COM including some nice trains painted in Amsterdam.

All photos were taken yesterday by Dave Stuart

Dave Stuart will appear as an Expert Judge on TV art show Next Big Thing coming on London Live in the Spring, details to follow.

 


London, Graffiti, Robbo, Banksy, wallpaperer, Regents Canal, feud,art,street art

New Information On Banksy Robbo Feud

One of the biggest feuds in art-world history, street artist Banksy v graffiti writer Robbo is revealed to have rumbled on much longer than fans and art historians previously thought.

In December 2009 street artist Banksy created 4 illegal pieces of stencil art on the sides of a canal in Camden, London.  One of the pieces, the Banksy Wallpaperer revived an ancient feud between the street artist Banksy and the then retired but still famous London graffiti writer known as Robbo.

By re-imagining a very old relic of Robbo graffiti dating from 1985 into a stencilled worker applying that graffiti as wallpaper, Banksy appeared to be suggesting that graffiti piece was perhaps just forgettable mass produced background rubbish.

Robbo and Banksy then engaged in a prolonged  tit-for-tat exchange of insults by re-working those four art pieces in Camden, starting with Robbo turning the wallpaper into “King Robbo” on Christmas Day 2010 as first reported on Graffoto.

Street Art, review, 2010, Graffoto.co.uk, street art tours, tour guide

Banksy v Robbo, 25th December 2009, photo Dave Stuart

Many articles record that Banksy insulted Robbo at a party in the late 90s, Robbo assaulted Banksy and Banksy had nurtured the grudge ever since until his attack on the Robbo relic at the turn of the decade.

In a virtual presentation last week on Banksy’s London street art, street art tour guide and long term writer, photographer and Banksy fan Dave Stuart played a re-discovered and never before reported snippet of an exclusive interview with Robbo in which he says that Banksy had been attacking Robbo graffiti years before the Camden 2009 takeover.

In the interview, asked if he had been attacking Banksy art before 2009 Robbo laughingly replies

“………. before the King Robbo? No, he’s dogged [gone over] me before that has happened, I can show you a picture, it’s in one of his books. “

Banksy stencil of a Smiley Copper in Shoreditch over Robbo, amended

Smiley Copper, Banksy, Shoreditch photo Dave Stuart

The picture Robbo refers to is the Smiley Copper in Wall and Piece (2005).  Robbo then confirms that the feud started in the Dragon Bar in Shoreditch in the 90s before going on to say

“And after that happened, there was a full name throw up [graffiti] of mine, “Robbo” and he decided to put the grim reaper or the smiley face over the top of it and at the time, I thought if that’s the best he can do … “

Examination of the Smiley Copper indeed shows the capital R of a piece of graffiti Robbo says was his has been squarely hit by the Smiley Copper which unusually has a huge Banksy tag across the centre of the artwork, leaving the intended recipient of the message in now doubt as to who has gone over him.  In the world of graffiti there is no point in making a timid little mark over someone else, if you intend to insult someone you go big and bold.

Banksy stencil of a Smiley Copper in Shoreditch over Robbo, amended

Banksy Smiley Copper (amended), photo Dave Stuart

The Smiley Copper is believe to date from 2003 which indicates Banksy was picking the scab on that wound long before 2009 as previously thought.

Sadly Robbo had a terrible accident in 2011 which left him in a coma until his passing in 2014, rest in peace King Robbo.

The virtual online presentation “Banksy – The London Chronicle” is to be repeated this coming weekend at 10pm GMT on Saturday 9th January and 12 noon GMT on Sunday 10th January, times deliberately selected for convenience of Banksy fans in Latin America and North America and those in Asia and the Far East.

All photos: Dave Stuart

Dave Stuart will appear as an Expert Judge on TV art show Next Big Thing coming on London Live in the Spring, details to follow


Photo montage, larger image is a Banksy stencil of boy with a bucket of red paint writing “Take this – society” and a second image of a stencilled rat with a paw dripping red paint and graffiti which says “If Graffiti changed anything it would be illegal”

Banksy London Chronicle Repeats


EDIT:

To show support and express appreciation for their efforts and sacrifice, a number of free spaces on the virtual “Banksy – The London Chronicle” have been set aside for frontline NHS staff. Please email info@shoreditchstreetarttours.co.uk stating NHS affiliation and which of the two presentations you would prefer.


Just announcing in response to popular demand a couple of repeat presentations of Banksy – The London Chronicle.

“Great overview, and indeed some rarities and never seen before stencils; Thanks Dave for setting this up !”  – Matt on Urban Art Association

It was incredibly heartening that the first online photo presentation was so warmly appreciated and I received several requests for the opportunity to enjoy the presentation at times better suited to Banksy fans outside the European time zones.  So, at risk of incurring the wrath of my wife who has endured this presentation more times than she needs I have scheduled two further presentations for the 2nd weekend in January.

Spend about an hour and 15 with me exploring the development of Banksy’s art, the impact he has had on popular culture and the growth of his role as social commentator through his street art career in London.

Saturday 9th January 2021 10pm GMT
so that’s New York 5pm EST;  West Coast 2pm PST.  Book this one HERE 

Sunday 10th January 2021  12 noon GMT which is:
Mumbai 1730 IST; Singapore SST, Perth AWST 2000 Melbourne 2300 AEDT  Please book this one HERE

Folk close to the GMT time zone are of course more than welcome to join.